In Memory Of:


January
January 05, 1970 2
January 26, 2007 1

59-60 Cruise book
No further info
Captain W.A. (Bill) McMahon
Plane crashed in Aleutian Islands 1959


January 05, 1970
Body not recovered
Larry Warren Robinson
Major
H&MS-11, MAG-11, 1ST MAW, III MAF(Flying VMFA 542 F4B with Lt Burnes)
United States Marine Corps
Randolph, Nebraska
October 06, 1937 to January 05, 1970
LARRY W ROBINSON is on the Wall at Panel 14W Line 001
Burial:
Body lost or destroyed


SYNOPSIS:   The McDonnell F4 Phantom used by Air Force, Marine and Navy air wings served a multitude of functions including fighter/bomber, interceptor, photo/electronic surveillance, and reconnaissance. The two man aircraft was extremely fast (Mach 2) and had a long range, 900 - 2300 miles depending on stores and mission type. The F4 was also extremely maneuverable and handled well at low and high altitudes. It was selected for a number of state-of-the-art electronics conversions, which improved radar intercept and computer bombing capabilities enormously. Most pilots considered it one of the "hottest" planes around.

Larry W. Robinson had officially completed his 100 missions prior to the 1969 Christmas truce. As he prepared to return home, a friend asked him to take his place on the flight schedule during the first series of operational missions after the Christmas Holiday cease-fire was terminated.

The Mu Gia Pass was considered a major gateway into the infamous Ho Chi Minh Trail and ran in a generally southeasterly direction through eastern Laos and the South Vietnam border at a point approximately 13 miles west of Khe Sanh. When North Vietnam began to increase its military strength in South Vietnam, NVA and Viet Cong troops again intruded on neutral Laos for sanctuary, as the Viet Minh had done during the war with the French some years before. This border road was used by the Communists to transport weapons, supplies and troops from North Vietnam into South Vietnam. It and was frequently no more than a path cut through the jungle covered mountains. US forces used all assets available to them to stop this flow of men and supplies from moving south into the war zone.

On 5 January 1970, Major Larry Robinson, pilot, and 1st Lt. Robert W. Burnes, radar intercept officer, comprised the crew of the lead F4B (aircraft #152281) in a multi-aircraft flight. They were conducting a strike mission over central Laos to attack an enemy position located along a primary artery of the infamous Ho Chi Minh Trail.

Major Robinson notified other flight members he was rolling in to attack the assigned target. During its pass, the Phantom was hit by hostile ground fire, crashed and burned. The aircraft wreckage was located in a very rugged jungle covered and very narrow valley between two mountain ranges just east of the primary road. The area of loss was approximately 5 miles east-southeast of Ban Namm, 20 miles northwest of Muang Xepon, 30 miles west of the Lao/South Vietnamese border, and 63 miles south-southeast of the Mu Gia Pass, Savannakhet Province, Laos.

Search and rescue (SAR) efforts were initiated immediately. During the search no parachutes were seen, no emergency beepers heard, and no trace of either crewman found. Because of the heavy enemy presence in the area, no ground search was possible. Both Robert Burnes and Larry Robinson were immediately listed Killed in Action/Body Not Recovered.

On 27 January 1970, US intelligence agencies intercepted at least three NVA radio messages pertaining to the shootdown of this F4 by the NVA's 14th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (AAA) Battalion, Binh Tram (way station) 34. Unfortunately, none of these messages made reference to the fate of Larry Robinson and Robert Burnes, either alive or dead. The crash site was also located approximately 1 mile north of Binh Tram 34.

Robert Burnes and Larry Robinson are among nearly 600 Americans who disappeared in Laos. Many of these men were known to be alive on the ground. The Laotians admitted holding "tens of tens" of American Prisoners of War, but these men were never negotiated for either by direct negotiation between our countries or through the Paris Peace Accords which ended the War in Vietnam since Laos was not a party to that agreement.

If Major Robinson and 1st Lt. Burnes died in the loss of their aircraft, each man has the right to have his remains returned to his family, friends and country. On the other hand, if they we able to eject their crippled Phantom, they most certainly would have been captured by the same NVA troops located in and around the way station. If so, their fate like that of other Americans who remain unaccounted for, could be quite different.

Since the end of the Vietnam War well over 21,000 reports of American prisoners, missing and otherwise unaccounted for have been received by our government. Many of these reports document LIVE America Prisoners of War remaining captive throughout Southeast Asia TODAY.

Fighter pilots in Vietnam and Laos were called upon to fly in many dangerous circumstances, and they were prepared to be wounded, killed or captured. It probably never occurred to them that they could be abandoned by the country they so proudly served.



January 05, 1970
Body not recovered
Robert Wayne Burnes
First Lieutenant
VMFA-542, MAG-11, 1ST MAW, III MAF
United States Marine Corps
Edmond, Oklahoma
January 27, 1941 to January 05, 1970
ROBERT W BURNES is on the Wall at Panel 15W Line 128
Burial:
Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington
Arlington County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Memorial Section G




January 26, 2007
LTJG Laura Berwager-Mankey
United States Navy
January 22, 1981 - January 26, 2007
Helicopter Crash
Burial:
Oakwood Memorial Park
Chatsworth
Los Angeles County
California, USA
Plot: Oakdale, Lot 19, Space 8



When Laura Berwager Mankey’s future mother-in-law wanted to learn more about the woman her son was planning to marry, she went straight to the top – to her commanding officer in the Navy.

“She was a warrior, but she never forgot that she was a lady,” Geri Mankey said, recalling the commanding officer’s words as she addressed about 200 mourners Saturday at a memorial service for the 26-year-old Navy pilot killed in a training mission off the coast of San Diego.

“How many mothers-in-law can say their daughter-in-law is actually perfect? … Laura continues to live with me every day, reminding me always to be more of a lady and more of a warrior, to do everything with more enthusiasm, more courage and selflessness and love.”

Lt. j.g. Mankey was killed Jan.26 along with three other sailors when their MH-60S Knighthawk helicopter crashed into the Pacific Ocean during a routine training flight near San Clemente Island. The cause is under investigation.

Mankey was born Laura Jean Berwager in Canoga Park and grew up in West Hills. She was a gregarious kid who spent 13 years in Girl Scouts and was voted Miss Popularity at Canoga Park High School, who joined the Navy to fulfill her dreams of flight but still baked cookies for her fellow officers.

Gina Gerber recalled her sister’s hair, which she would style when they were younger.

“As an adult, she loved helmet hair,” she said. “It would have shown that she had flown.”

Laura also was deeply spiritual. Whenever she transferred to a new town, one of the first things she did was look for a local church, said the Rev. Eric Thomas, who recalled meeting Laura when she was just 5days old.

“Holding her here and praying to God that she would follow the right path, I believed from that fateful day that Jesus preceded her,” said Thomas of Christ Community Church in Winnetka, where the service was held.

Laura’s husband, Navy Lt. Jeff Mankey, cried but also laughed Saturday as he recalled his wife’s sunny disposition. Not even a rainstorm could ruin the good times during the couple’s recent Fourth of July picnic.

“Oh my gosh, we could have a picnic on the living room floor,” he said, recalling his wife’s reaction when the day’s sun turned into a downpour. “She was willing to try anything.”

Though their assignments often separated them, their hearts were never far apart.

“We fell asleep on the phone, then (would) wake up and still be connected,” Mankey said.

Brother Gene Berwager called his sister a friend and his hero.

“Laura was really an achiever,” he said. “She achieved everything that she set out to do. Everything that she did in life was for the good of others.”

At her wedding, Gene Berwager recalled dropping his tough older-brother persona to dance with his sister.

“Did you know that you’re holding me?” he recalled asking her the moment they hit the dance floor. “You never held me before.”

The siblings did manage to make up for lapsed hugs, and Gene offered advice for others.

“Make sure you give ’em hugs,” he said. “You never know if it is going to be your last one.”



February
0
















March
March 30, 1967 1


March 30, 1967
Edward Joseph Keglovits
Second Lieutenant
VMFA-542, MAG-13, 1ST MAW, III MAF
United States Marine Corps
Northampton, Pennsylvania
February 08, 1938 to March 30, 1967
EDWARD J KEGLOVITS is on the Wall at Panel 17E Line 07
Burial:
Our Lady of Hungary Cemetery
Northampton Northampton County
Pennsylvania, USA
Plot: Section - S, Lot 356, Grave - B


1LT J.B. GELLER, USMC and 2LT EDWARD JOSEPH KEGLOVITS, USMC were flying an F-4B of the VMFA-542 Bengals and MAG-13 out of Chu Lai on a close air support mission near the Marine Corps base at Khe Sanh. On their first attack they were hit by enemy ground fire and forced to eject immediately. 1LT GELLER, the pilot, ejected safely and was rescued by a Marine helicopter. Inexplicably, 2LT KEGLOVITS rode the aircraft into the ground and was Killed in Action



April
April 16, 1968 1

April 16, 1968
Larry Dean Warren
Private First Class
B CO, 326TH MED BN, 101ST ABN DIV, USARV
Army of the United States
Liberal, Kansas
October 31, 1947 to April 16, 1968
LARRY D WARREN is on the Wall at Panel 50E Line 023
BR Brother
Burial: Liberal Cemetery
Seward County
Kansas, USA
 




May
May 17, 1967 1
May 18, 1969 2
May 29, 1944 1

May 17, 1967
Gary William Hoglund
Captain
H&S CO, 1ST BN, 1ST MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF
United States Marine Corps
Duluth, Minnesota
April 11, 1943 to May 17, 1967
GARY W HOGLUND is on the Wall at
Panel 20E Line 016
Burial: Sunrise Memorial Park
Hermantown St. Louis County
Minnesota, USA


May 17, 1967
Quang Nam, Vietnam

Gary was the husband of Arnette D. Hoglund and loving father of Troy W. Hoglund of Meridian Mississippi, he was the son of Justa J. Hoglund and Hazel R. Hoglund and dear nephew of Eric Hoglund of Duluth Minnesota. He enlisted in the US Marine Corps on January 17, 1963 and was commissioned as a 2dLt in Quantico VA. A veteran of over four years of service he entered extended active duty on July 20 1965 in Kingville TX. In Vietnam, 1stLt Hoglund was assigned as a Forward Air Control Officer and served with H&S Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st MARDIV (Rein) FMF.

With the termination of Operation UNION at the beginning of the month, the Battalion continued with its assigned mission of patrolling south of the Da Nang Military Complex. On May 17, during a 81mm mortar fire mission one round fell approximately 40 meters after being fired, impacted in the Marines perimeter and exploded. 1stLt Hoglund was mortally wounded by the fragmentation wounds he sustained by the short round.

* 1stLt Gary Hoglund received a posthumous promotion to Captain.

Burial:
Sunrise Memorial Park
Hermantown
St. Louis County
Minnesota, USA




May 18, 1969
Charles William Pigott
Captain
VMFA-542, MAG-11, 1ST MAW, III MAF
United States Marine Corps
East Providence, Rhode Island
December 09, 1944 to May 18, 1969
CHARLES W PIGOTT is on the Wall at Panel 24W Line 048

Burial: Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington Arlington County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Section 46 Site 1241-C


A Note from The Virtual Wall
On 18 May 1969 a Marine KC-130 was refueling two F-4B aircraft from VMFA-314 near Phu Bai, just south of Hue. As the three aircraft flew in formation, with the Phantoms plugged in and taking fuel, a third F-4B from VMFA-542 on an opposite track collided with the C-130's starboard wing near the #3 engine. The collision destroyed the VMFA-542 F-4, sheared the wing from the C-130, and inflicted damage to the VMFA-314 F-4 which was refueling from the starboard drogue.

While one VMFA-314 aircraft was undamaged and recovered at Chu Lai without difficulty, the second VMFA-314 F-4's two crewmen were forced to abandon their aircraft but were rescued. All eight men aboard the C-130 and VMFA-542 F-4 were killed in the accident:


May 18, 1969
John Laurence Nalls
Captain
VMFA-542, MAG-11, 1ST MAW
United States Marine Corps
09 June 1942 - 18 May 1969
Washington, District of Columbia
John Lawrence Nalls is on the Wall at
Panel 24W Line 046
Burial:Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington Arlington County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Section 53 Site 435



A Note from The Virtual Wall
On 18 May 1969 a Marine KC-130 was refueling two F-4B aircraft from VMFA-314 near Phu Bai, just south of Hue. As the three aircraft flew in formation, with the Phantoms plugged in and taking fuel, a third F-4B from VMFA-542 on an opposite track collided with the C-130's starboard wing near the #3 engine. The collision destroyed the VMFA-542 F-4, sheared the wing from the C-130, and inflicted damage to the VMFA-314 F-4 which was refueling from the starboard drogue.

While one VMFA-314 aircraft was undamaged and recovered at Chu Lai without difficulty, the second VMFA-314 F-4's two crewmen were forced to abandon their aircraft but were rescued. All eight men aboard the C-130 and VMFA-542 F-4 were killed in the accident:



May 29, 1944
05/29/1944

Roy D Nicholson
Pvt
05/29/1944
US Army
34 Inf Div
My Uncle
Burial:
Marietta National Cemetery
Marietta
Cobb County
Georgia, USA
Plot: 'G, 6346-A
NICHOLSON, ROY D. 34826573 PVT  KIA 29-May-1944





June
15 June 1965 2
28 June 05 1

June 15, 1965
1st LT. Ira Richard Houghton

VMFA‑542
15th June 1965
F-4B Phantom II
149444
WH
Crashed Tokyo Bay, Japan. Killed lost at sea.
Flying with WO Lloyd W.Wilder
Burial:
Highland Cemetery
Hamilton
Caldwell County
Missouri, USA




June 15, 1965
WO Lloyd W Wilder 15 June 1965

VMFA‑542
15th June 1965
F-4B Phantom II
149444
WH
WO Lloyd W Wilder VMFA 542 15 June 1965.jpg

Crashed Tokyo Bay, Japan. Killed lost at sea.
Flying with 1Lt Ira Richard Houghton
Birth: 1939, USA
Death: Jun., 1965, Japan

Burial: Body lost at sea






June 28, 2005
SPC Rafael Carrillo,
21 y/o, KIA 28 June 05 -
Carrillo was  HMMWV gunners in Iraq,
Mortar PLT, 1-64AR, 3ID.
BR Brother
Burial: Cook Walden Forest Oaks Memorial Park
Austin Travis County
Texas, USA









July
July 02, 1967 2



July 02, 1967
Ray Daniel Pendergraft
Major
VMFA-542, MAG-13, 1ST MAW, III MAF
United States Marine Corps
March 11, 1930 to July 02, 1967
RAY D PENDERGRAFT is on the Wall at
Panel 22E, Line 112
Middletown, Ohio
Burial: Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery
San Diego San Diego County
California, USA
Plot: MA 0 111


Notes from The Virtual Wall
At 10 AM on 2 July 1967, Bravo Company 1/9 Marines were on patrol about 1-1/2 miles northeast of Con Thien when they made contact with what they thought was a small, well-entrenched enemy unit. Alpha 1/9, also on patrol nearby, came to help, and the two understrength companies found themselves in a meat grinder - the small enemy force turned out to be 5 NVA battalions that had crossed the DMZ. Even worse, the NVA troops were supported by artillery firing from within and north of the DMZ. Two Battalion Landing Teams, one each from USS TRIPOLI and USS OKINAWA, were committed in support of what became a week-long pitched battle. Fixed wing air support also was called in to support the Marine infantrymen.

Major Ray D. Pendergraft, pilot, and Captain David G. Spearman, Radar Intercept Officer, in F-4B BuNo 151421 were part of the response. While attacking NVA forces near Kinh Mon, actually within the DMZ proper, their aircraft was hit by ground fire. His wingman followed Pendergraft out to sea and watched helplessly as the F-4B crashed at sea. Both crewmen died in the crash.

Major Bruce A. Martin, flying an F-8E (BuNo 150286) of VMF(AW)-232, observed Major Pendergraft's aircraft leaving the target area trailing smoke; he also saw it go into the water. Only minutes later Martin himself was hit by ground fire while making a low-level bombing run on NVA positions near Thon Cam Son, also within the DMZ. His aircraft on fire, Major Martin headed for the open water, escorted by a section of A-4s. By the time the fire forced him to eject, a USAF HH-3 helicopter was on scene, having launched from Danang in response to the SAR call for Major Pendergraft's aircraft. Major Martin was picked up and survived the incident.

On the ground, 3rd Battalion, 9th Marines, had been inserted by helicopter on the enemy's left flank and the massive weight of U. S. air and artillery support was taking its toll on the NVA. By evening the NVA had broken contact, withdrawing into the DMZ.

By that time Bravo 1/9 had been destroyed as a fighting force - Bravo 1/9, understrength to begin with, had 58 men killed in action. Alpha 1/9 had 13 killed in action, and H&S Company 15 - including eight Corpsmen.



July 02, 1967
David Glenn Spearman
Captain
VMFA-542, MAG-13, 1ST MAW, III MAF
United States Marine Corps
Danville, Virginia
June 15, 1939 to July 02, 1967
DAVID G SPEARMAN is on the Wall at Panel 22E Line 115
Burial: Danville Memorial Gardens
Danville Danville City
Virginia, USA




















August
August 19, 1969 2
August 29, 1969 2



August 19, 1969
Repatriated: 07/31/1989 (Returned to US soil)
Identified: 06/13/1997

John Norlee Flanigan
Captain
VMFA-542, MAG-11, 1ST MAW, III MAF
United States Marine Corps
Winter Haven, Florida
August 07, 1934 to January 28, 1974
(Incident Date August 19, 1969)

JOHN N FLANIGAN is on the Wall at Panel 19W Line 067
Burial:Oaklawn Cemetery
Winter Haven Polk County
Florida, USA


SYNOPSIS: On August 19, 1969, Lt.Col. Robert N. Smith, pilot, and Capt. John N.
Flanigan, radar intercept officer, departed Da Nang in their F4B Phantom
fighter/bomber jet aircraft to fly escort on a photo reconnaissance mission
just north of the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ).

Smith's aircraft made one run over the target, and then he and the other
aircraft separated and were supposed to rendezvous for a second run. Smith
never returned for the second run, and contact was never established with Smith
or his backseater.

It was never determined whether Smith's aircraft was shot down or crashed
because of a malfunction. However, the area in which they were last seen, about
5 miles east of the city of Vinh Linh in Quang Binh Province, North Vietnam,
was relatively heavily defended. The U.S. believes there is a high degree of
probability that the enemy knew what happened to Smith and Flanigan.

Smith and Flanigan were not among the prisoners of war that were released in
1973. High ranking U.S. officials admit their dismay that "hundreds" of
suspected American prisoners of war did not return.

Alarmingly, evidence continues to mount that Americans were left as prisoners
in Southeast Asia and continue to be held today. Unlike "MIAs" from other wars,
most of the nearly 2500 men and women who remain missing in Southeast Asia can
be accounted for. Smith and Flanigan could be among them. Isn't it time we
brought our men home?

In 1993 and 1995, joint U.S. and Vietnamese teams investigated and excavated
a crash site in Hai Phong Province. Local villagers reported that remains
had previously recovered and turned over to higher authorities. They also
turned over bone fragments found near the crash site.
On August 19, 1969, Flanigan and his pilot were flying an F-4B as escort for
a photo recon mission over North Vietnam. They lost contact with other
aircraft in their flight, and never made it back to their base at Danang,
South Vietnam. In 1989, the Vietnamese gov. repatriated remains believed to
be those of Flanigan. Four subsequent joint US and Vietnamese
investigations were able to locate their crash site in Quang Binh Province.
The site was excavated in 1995 where aircraft wreckage, aircrew related
items, and personnel effects were located, but NO human remains were found.
The remains of Flanigan turned over by the Vietnamese were positively
identified and Mitochondrial DNA testing was used to confirm the
identification.



August 19, 1969
Body not recovered
Robert Norman Smith
Colonel
MAG-11, 1ST MAW, III MAF (Flying VMFA 542 F4B with Capt Flanigan)
United States Marine Corps
Trucksville, Pennsylvania
September 20, 1926 to March 05, 1979
(Incident Date August 19, 1969)
ROBERT N SMITH is on the Wall at Panel 19W Line 074
Body not recovered Hostile, died while missing
Burial:
Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington
Arlington County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Memorial Section I


SYNOPSIS: On August 19, 1969, Lt.Col. Robert N. Smith, pilot, and Capt. John N.
Flanigan, radar intercept officer, departed Da Nang in their F4B Phantom
fighter/bomber jet aircraft to fly escort on a photo reconnaissance mission
just north of the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ).

Smith's aircraft made one run over the target, and then he and the other
aircraft separated and were supposed to rendezvous for a second run. Smith
never returned for the second run, and contact was never established with Smith
or his backseater.

It was never determined whether Smith's aircraft was shot down or crashed
because of a malfunction. However, the area in which they were last seen, about
5 miles east of the city of Vinh Linh in Quang Binh Province, North Vietnam,
was relatively heavily defended. The U.S. believes there is a high degree of
probability that the enemy knew what happened to Smith and Flanigan.

Smith and Flanigan were not among the prisoners of war that were released in
1973. High ranking U.S. officials admit their dismay that "hundreds" of
suspected American prisoners of war did not return.

Alarmingly, evidence continues to mount that Americans were left as prisoners
in Southeast Asia and continue to be held today. Unlike "MIAs" from other wars,
most of the nearly 2500 men and women who remain missing in Southeast Asia can
be accounted for. Smith and Flanigan could be among them. Isn't it time we
brought our men home?

In 1993 and 1995, joint U.S. and Vietnamese teams investigated and excavated
a crash site in Hai Phong Province. Local villagers reported that remains
had previously recovered and turned over to higher authorities. They also
turned over bone fragments found near the crash site.
On August 19, 1969, Flanigan and his pilot were flying an F-4B as escort for
a photo recon mission over North Vietnam. They lost contact with other
aircraft in their flight, and never made it back to their base at Danang,
South Vietnam. In 1989, the Vietnamese gov. repatriated remains believed to
be those of Flanigan. Four subsequent joint US and Vietnamese
investigations were able to locate their crash site in Quang Binh Province.
The site was excavated in 1995 where aircraft wreckage, aircrew related
items, and personnel effects were located, but NO human remains were found.
The remains of Flanigan turned over by the Vietnamese were positively
identified and Mitochondrial DNA testing was used to confirm the
identification.


August 29, 1969
Body not recovered
Jerry Allen Zimmer
Captain
VMFA-542, MAG-11, 1ST MAW, III MAF
United States Marine Corps
Maine, New York
May 05, 1944 to August 29, 1969
JERRY A ZIMMER is on the Wall at
Panel 18W Line 009
Burial:
Maine Cemetery
Maine Broome County
New York, USA
Burial: Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington Arlington County
Virginia, USA



Background: 1969

My first husband, Capt Jerry A Zimmer, USMC, and 1st Lt Al Graf, USMC, were killed in Vietnam on August 29, 1969, when their F4 was shot down over the Que Son Mountains, approximately 20 miles south of Da Nang Air Base where they were attached to VMFA 542, an F4B squadron. My husband was the pilot, and Al was his Radar Intercept Officer (RIO). Due to the wartime situation and heavy armament on their aircraft, no remains were recovered, and I was told by Marine Corps officials—including Jerry’s Commanding Officer--not to expect any changes in that assessment in the future. The aircraft was armed with napalm, 500 lb Snake-eye bombs and full fuel, so I didn’t contest their findings. Jerry and Al were clearing a landing zone for a Recon insert, a seemingly routine mission, when the plane was hit during its first bombing run, by 50 Cals hidden in the mountainside. Soon after, the 1st Force Recon team (Sailfish), led by 2nd Lt. Wayne Rollings, USMC, (now Maj Gen Rollings, ret) hiked to the area and verified that there were no survivors.

August 29, 1969
Body not recovered
Albert Stephen Graf
First Lieutenant
VMFA-542, MAG-11, 1ST MAW, III MAF
United States Marine Corps
Bogota, New Jersey
September 08, 1944 to August 29, 1969
ALBERT S GRAF is on the Wall at Panel 18W Line 006

Burial: Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington Arlington County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Sec: MK, Site: 166





September
September 19, 1968 2
26 September 1967 1

September 19, 1968
Repatriat08/04/94
Identified: 05/19/99

John Allen La Voo
Captain
VMFA-542, MAG-11, 1ST MAW, III MAF
United States Marine Corps
Pueblo, Colorado
July 15, 1940 to September 19, 1968
JOHN A LA VOO is on the Wall at
 Panel 43W Line 039

Burial:Arlington National Cemetery
ArlingtonArlington County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Section 60 Site 7829




September 19, 1968
Repatriat08/04/94
Identified: 05/19/99

Robert Alal Holt
Captain

VMFA-542, MAG-11, 1ST MAW
United States Marine Corps
13 June 1942 - 19 September 1968
Reading, Massachusetts
Robert Alan Holt is on the Wall at
Panel 43W Line 037
On July 19, 1999, an unusual and unique ceremony was held in Arlington National Cemetery. With full military honors, the identifiable remains of the pilot, Captain John A. La Voo were interred. In a separate plot next to Captain La Voo, the unidentifiable remains of both crewmen were interred. Finally, Bob's identifiable remains of were returned to his father, transported to Reading, MA, and formally interred at Forest Glen Cemetery, where his mother, Shirley B. Holt, was buried.
Burial:
Forest Glen Cemetery
Reading
Middlesex County
Massachusetts, USA
Burial:
Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington
Arlington County
Virginia, USA
Plot: Section 60 Site 7830










September 26, 1967
1967/9/26 F-4B 148422 VMFA-542 WH- Ground fire
MAJ P M Cole (SURVIVED)
1LT Harold John Moe (KIA)
20140726_171024.jpg

Harold John Moe
Captain
H&MS-13, MAG-13, 1ST MAW, III MAF
United States Marine Corps
Eau Claire, Wisconsin
July 11, 1938 to September 26, 1967
HAROLD J MOE is on the Wall at Panel 27E Line 017
Body not recovered
Burial:
Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery
San Diego San Diego County
California, USA
Plot: MA 0 88
Burial:
Oak Grove Cemetery
Eau Claire Eau Claire County
Wisconsin, USA
MIA marker on southwest part of the cemetery, 2nd row in from the South, 4th column from the West grass service road next to his parents, Bernard J & Cleo Z Moe.

Harold lwas assigned to Headquarters & Maintenance-13, Marine Aircraft Group-13,1st Marine Division.

The aircraft(VMFA-542)that he was on was hit by hostile ground fire while flying a direct air support mission of an operation over North Vietnam. Harold ejected from the aircraft and his parachute failed to open and he fell into
the sea,11 kilometers northeast of Cau Viet River Mouth in the vicinity of Dong Ha. His body was not recovered.

Harold was married and is survived by his widow;Nancy J Moe, his two
daughters;Kimberely J and Jacqueline G and his four sons; Michael J, Kevin J, Gregory D and James H Moe of 1205 Kathy Lane,Santa Ana,
CA.



October
October 19, 1967 2

October 19, 1967
Glenn Gates Jacks
Major
VMFA-542, MAG-13, 1ST MAW, III MAF
United States Marine Corps
Laurel, Mississippi
March 08, 1933 to October 19, 1967
GLENN G JACKS is on the Wall at
Panel 28E Line 040
Burial: Natchez National Cemetery
Natchez Adams County
Mississippi, USA
Plot: D, 0, 753

I was member of the Ordnance Shop from Dec. 1966 to Nov. 1967. I have fond memories of Major Jacks. He was an Exceptional Marine Aviator and a fine Marine. I recall his great sense of humor and the respect he had for all of his fellow Marines, especially the "grunts" on the ground that seem to always need our support. Major Jacks and his ( RIO )Fred MacGreary were a excellent aircrew. They were encouraging to all and seemed to help us forget the stress of the day and just how tired we all were. I recall times when they would return from a sortie, stay in the aircraft during hot re-fuleing while we would be loading ordnance on the plane only to take off again for another sortie. Major Jacks and Lt MacGreary were great men to serve with in Vietnam. They both understood the need that our "grunts" had on the ground. They were occasions I remember when Major Jacks returned from a sortie, only to find the top branches of trees lodged in the external bomb racks. That is the definition of " close air support".

I was there on that fate full day 10/19/1967. I was on the flight line that day. The plane was loaded with (12) Snake Eye 500lb Bombs and I pulled the safety pins on the bomb racks and watched the plane taxi down toward the end of the runway. The F4 toke off with full afterburners and I started to walk back to the shop when I heard a sound of flame out from one of the engines. I looked up and saw the F4 turning toward the South China Sea and then I heard what was a flame out of the other J79 Engine. The F4 hit the ground soon afterwards and all 12 bombs detonated upon impact. Major Jacks could have kept the plane headed north and avoided the turn, and they both could have ejected and survived, but Major Jacks did not do this because it would have destroyed the village ( An Ton) at the end of the runway. Major Jacks marched to a different drummer and saved the village. A fine man that I am glad to have met in this journey of life. A moment in life that I will never forget until I see Maj Jacks in the great beyond. One week later I was transferred TDY to Atsigu Naval Air Station, Atsigu, Japan until January of 1968.

I will search my photos and see if I can find any pictures that I can send to his relative.

Semper Fi"

LCpl-Sgt Thomas Smith
VMFA 542
Ordanance Shop


October 19, 1967
Fred Ernest MacGeary
First Lieutenant
VMFA 542, MAG 13, 1ST MAW
United States Marine Corps
24 April 1928 - 19 October 1967
Inglewood, CA
Fred Ernest MacGeary is on the Wall at
Panel 28E Line 041
Burial: Beaufort National Cemetery
Beaufort Beaufort County
South Carolina, USA
Plot: Sec 16 Site 60

















November
November 25, 1969 1

November 25, 1969 WIA
Died San Diego, Ca 12/17/1969
Charles Quinten Polk
Private First Class
I CO, 3RD BN, 5TH MARINES, 1ST MARDIV, III MAF
United States Marine Corps
Lufkin, Texas
September 22, 1949 to December 17, 1969
(Incident Date November 25, 1969)
CHARLES Q POLK is on the Wall at Panel 15W Line 067
BR Brother
Burial: Rocky Hill Cemetery
Lufkin Angelina County
Texas, USA


Last Known Activity
BOOBYTRAPPED GRENADE ON PATROL 3 KM NORTHEAST OF THE AN HOA AIR FIELD 19691125
UTM grid reference is AT892502
WIA 25Nov, died NavHosp San Diego, CA














December